Human Rights and Schooling: Developing Research

EDC&I 505A (Seattle); B EDUC 520 A (Bothell)

July 10-July 21

This course will examine how human rights inform educational theory and research to support social justice.  Its framework is that learning communities are not neutral and educators and researchers have a choice about whether to disrupt or ignore systemic injustice.  Human rights education recognizes multiple identities and offers a moral and legal framework for justice appropriate to a global age. This course will critically examine the strengths and limitations of the human rights framework, considering it alongside other concepts and frameworks, including intersectionality, universality, recognition, and narrative. Intersectionality offers researchers a tool to examine how multiple and interwoven inequalities (related to gender, ethnicity, sexuality, migration status etc.) influence achievement, citizenship, and participation.

Audrey Osler is Professor of Education at the University College of Southeast Norway and the University of Leeds, where she founded the Centre for Citizenship and Human Rights Education. Her research addresses human rights and democratic citizenship education policy and practice, in established democracies and post-conflict societies. She has held professorships and visiting professorships at universities in Europe, the U.S. and East Asia. In 2015 she was awarded a fellowship by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS). Osler acts as expert to the Council of Europe, European Commission and UNESCO.

She has a long-standing interest in the place of narrative and life history in education research and practice and her PhD (published as The Education and Careers of Black Teachers – 1997, Open University Press) examined the contribution of minority teachers to transformative education. She is currently building profiles of migrant teachers across Europe. Audrey Osler acts as expert to a number of international bodies, including Council of Europe, European Commission and UNESCO.
Professor Osler has published over 120 scientific articles and 19 books. Her 2016 book Human Rights and Schooling: an ethical framework for teaching for social justice is published by Teachers College Press, New York.

This course will examine how human rights inform educational theory and research to support social justice.  Its framework is that learning communities are not neutral and educators and researchers have a choice about whether to disrupt or ignore systemic injustice.  Human rights education recognizes multiple identities and offers a moral and legal framework for justice appropriate to a global age. This course will critically examine the strengths and limitations of the human rights framework, considering it alongside other concepts and frameworks, including intersectionality, universality, recognition, and narrative. Intersectionality offers researchers a tool to examine how multiple and interwoven inequalities (related to gender, ethnicity, sexuality, migration status etc.) influence achievement, citizenship, and participation.

Course flyer