Hess ‘98 honored with College’s Distinguished Alumnus Award

Jun 1 2018

Diana Hess (PhD '98), a scholar renowned for her work advancing civic education, has received the University of Washington College of Education’s 2018 Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Hess, dean of the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and holder the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education, is winner of two of the most prestigious awards in education research: the American Educational Research Association’s Outstanding Book Award (2016) and the Grawemeyer Award in Education (2017).

Facebook Live chat explores youth suicide and mental health

May 24 2018

University of Washington College of Education Professor James Mazza, a former president of the American Association of Suicidology, recently answered questions about youth suicide, mental health issues and the role of educators during a Facebook Live chat.

Shaping the future of Native education

Tleena Ives
May 10 2018

Tleena Ives grew up immersed in the language and culture of her Native people, the Port Gamble S'Klallam Tribe—knowledge gleaned from her extended family and her early education.

"My memories from my early experience in education included learning to speak in S'Klallam, learning our traditional songs and dances, and being instilled with a great sense of cultural identity," Ives said.

So when it came to the education of her own four children, she worked ardently as a parent volunteer to help shape the tribe's early learning curriculum to reflect this important heritage.

AERA Highlight: Redesigning the kindergarten science classroom

Kindergarten teacher and students
Apr 17 2018

A three-year, teacher-researcher partnership focused on the implementation of Next Generation Science Standards in an urban kindergarten classroom highlights how a designed learning environment can support the learning of emergent bilingual students.

AERA Highlight: Designing for next generation teaching practices

Teachers and coaches
Apr 15 2018

Examples of sustained instructional improvement across an entire school district are rare, but a five-year research-practice partnership between the University of Washington College of Education and a mid-sized urban district highlights the power of networked educators.

AERA Highlight: Strengthening argumentation in environmental science

Students in environmental science class
Apr 14 2018

Learning how to use evidence in making an argument is a critical skill for students to build, yet difficulties frequently arise when discipline-based learning goals conflict with schooling tasks.

University of Washington College of Education researchers took on that challenge by partnering with teachers of a project-based AP Environmental Science course to develop and revise design principles for creating "material tools" that can adequately scaffold disciplinary practice and support formative assessment, while also helping students' create better arguments.

Book offers guidance on creating greater instructional coherence

Teachers in professional development
Apr 6 2018

For education leaders across the country, a perpetually vexing problem is how to sustain improvement in instruction across schools over an extended period.

Kara Jackson, associate professor of mathematics education at the University of Washington College of Education, notes that while there’s a wealth of research on how to improve teaching practice and student outcomes, that progress is hard to scale beyond individual classrooms or a single school.

Teacher leader connects math to students' lives

Mar 30 2018

As a 6th grade math teacher in Highline School District, Raphael Munavu’s passion for social justice defines his approach to teaching math.

With every lesson, he strives to help students connect math to their own lives, enabling them to think critically about the world around them.

Playdough to Plato

Debi Talukdar
Mar 27 2018

The following story was originally published in the March 2018 edition of Columns magazine.

On a chilly day in November, the third grade classroom in Seattle’s John Muir Elementary School is cozy. Colorful posters cover the walls and beneath them, children fidget and giggle. The teacher, Marjorie Lamarre, urges the class to quiet down and gather in a circle on a big red mat.

Positioning students as knowledge builders

Mar 15 2018

As a high school student in South Korea, University of Washington College of Education PhD student Soo-Yean Shim was already imagining alternative approaches to make science classes engaging for all students.

Her inspiration came during a transformative experience in which she joined a genetics research team at a local university. In helping the team collect data, Shim found herself making sense of the world using resources and experimental data that she had gathered herself.