Alumni honored by National Council for the Social Studies

Noah Zeichner and Diana Hess
Nov 16 2017

Noah Zeichner (MIT '04) and Diana Hess (PhD '98) are being honored by the National Council for the Social Studies during its annual conference this November.

Zeichner, who teaches at Ingraham International High School in Seattle will receive the 2017 Award for Global Understanding while Hess, dean of University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education, will receive the 2017 Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research in Social Studies Award.

Doctoral student's mission: Training the great teachers of tomorrow

Weijia Wang
Nov 2 2017

For the past decade, Weijia Wang has been on a journey to discover what makes an excellent teacher.

That journey started in China when, as a high school student, Wang heard reports that there was a large gap in teacher quality, especially in English, across the country. Wang would go on to earn her master’s in English education at Shanghai International Studies University, but despite earning excellent grades, she soon realized that she was unprepared for the rigors of real-world teaching.

Professor explores ‘The Struggle for the Soul of Teacher Education’

Elementary teacher candidate
Oct 31 2017

Across the United States, and indeed throughout the world, there’s passionate debate about how to best prepare teachers and ensure all students are taught by highly-qualified educators.

Focus on professional growth, leadership key to Washington’s new teacher evaluation

Teacher with a student
Oct 30 2017

Sustaining ongoing improvement in instruction is a persistent challenge for schools and districts, but Washington state’s adoption of a new teacher and principal evaluation system earlier this decade is contributing to more collaborative improvement efforts, a new study by University of Washington College of Education researchers finds.

Partnership brings ‘Next Generation’ science into Seattle classrooms

Science teaching with elementary students
Oct 6 2017

The town of Faraday has a problem.

Its citizens are interested in building a magnetic train to make it easier to connect with other towns, but they need to figure out how to make the technology work.

That’s where the town’s scientists—in this case a group of two dozen Seattle 3rd, 4th and 5th graders enrolled in a summer learning program in the Beacon Hill neighborhood—come in.

It’s their job to collect evidence about how magnets work, determine whether the technology could be used to power a train and then explain their findings to the citizens of Faraday.

Teacher leader brings equity into the classroom

Ryan Mateo Sharnbroich
Sep 7 2017

Sixth-grade teacher Ryan Mateo Sharnbroich has one goal for the first day of school: to make sure his students know they are welcomed and understood in his classroom. Sharnbroich, who is pursuing his Master of Education in Instructional Leadership, is laying the foundation to embrace difficult and sensitive conversations about equity and difference with his students later in the year.

Taking on teaching for social justice

EduDesign Lab 2017
Aug 15 2017

For elementary teachers, it’s an increasingly tricky question to contend with: How to address immigration, race, gender identity and other social justice issues that touch the lives and futures of their students?

Even as public schools in the United States grow more diverse and systemic inequities continue to impact the quality of education available to students, educators rarely have time to authentically work together on how to address those issues of inequity in their teaching.

Improving practice, inspiring growth

Summer Leadership Institute
Jul 20 2017

For several years, Stacy Thomas (EdD ‘15) and her colleagues at Blaine School District watched with concern as approximately half of 3rd graders weren’t able to read at their grade level.

“Our scores district-wide had been hovering in that range for quite some time, and there were indications it seemed to be getting worse,” said Thomas, the district’s executive director of teaching and learning.

Building community in the teaching profession

Elzena McVicar
Jul 17 2017

Growing up in New Orleans, Elzena McVicar (MIT ‘10) was surrounded by a family filled with teachers. Years of family conversations about education convinced McVicar that teaching was not for her.

While working on her bachelor's degree in anthropology, however, McVicar took a work study job as a tutor. Then, after graduating from college, she found herself working in an elementary school as an AmeriCorps volunteer. These two experiences changed McVicar’s perceptions of education, ultimately leading her in a new professional direction.

Connecting learning with making

Virtual reality 3D painting
Jul 13 2017

When Luke Reichley was in elementary school 20-odd years ago, paint and clay were his primary tools for making.

While children have long used their imaginations to create toys and art from whatever is at hand, digital technologies are opening new opportunities for educators to bring making into their classrooms. This summer, Reichley and his fellow elementary teacher candidates at the University of Washington College of Education are experiencing a glimpse into that future.