Graduation ceremonies highlight Class of 2019's role in advancing educational justice

Jun 12 2019

More than 700 new educators, researchers and leaders were honored during the University of Washington College of Education’s graduation ceremonies on June 11, with speakers highlighting the Class of 2019’s power to advance educational justice.

National Academy of Education/Spencer fellowships awarded to UW faculty members and student

Jun 3 2019

Two scholars who will join the University of Washington College of Education faculty during the coming academic year and a current doctoral student have received fellowships from the National Academy of Education (NAEd)/Spencer Foundation to support projects that aim to improve academic and life outcomes for young people from historically marginalized communities.

Incoming UW faculty members Emma Elliott-Groves and Maribel Santiago were selected as 2019 NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellows while doctoral student Hannah Nieman received an NAEd/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship.

A journey into teaching comes full circle

Apr 18 2019

Growing up in Ontario, Canada as the eldest of five children Emma-Marie Bishun Harrison (MIT ‘19) is no stranger to hard work and change. Like many students, Harrison's path to teaching hasn't been a straight line, but the detours have provided a deeper understanding of her calling to teach. She recalls her experience as a process of trial and error.

Early on, Harrison said she envisioned herself being a doctor, but after fainting at the sight of blood in her high school biology course she decided it was time to look into other career options. 

Learning the people behind the business

Apr 29 2019

“What doesn’t kill you makes you stronger” may be a common enough phrase, but for Alyssa Eckroth, it’s shaped her approach to life.

“I think it relates to a lot of things,” she said. “One is resiliency and persevering through the ‘No’s’ in your life. The other is just getting through the days when you have a full schedule all the time.”

Husky 100 names six education students

Apr 16 2019

Six University of Washington College of Education students were named in this year’s cohort of the Husky 100. These students each embrace their personal backgrounds and passions as guides for helping disadvantaged groups reach new levels of education and equality.

Representing the College are:

AERA Highlight: Latino immigrant parents’ perceptions of self-regulation

Apr 12 2019

While a growing body of research points to the importance of children’s self-regulation skills in early academic success and social-emotional development, little is known about Latino immigrant parents’ perceptions of self-regulation and their own parenting practices.

MIT student endeavors to empower middle-school students

Mar 25 2019

At Seattle’s Meany Middle School, Yani Robinson sees hope and an idealistic outlook among students that he recognizes from his own experiences at that age. He recalls an eighth-grade teacher who allowed him and his classmates to protest the Iraq War or call the White House during class.

“He just gave us the tools to think beyond what we saw, and he gave us tools to process the unhappiness you sometimes feel when you start realizing things in the real world,” Robinson said. “I think that really changed something for me.”

UW College of Education ranked #14 in nation

Mar 12 2019

U.S. News & World Report has ranked the University of Washington College of Education No. 14 among the nation's best education schools—and No. 5 among education schools at public institutions—in its annual graduate school ratings, released March 12.

Dean Mia Tuan said the ranking underscores the College's commitment to equity-focused partnerships with schools and communities throughout Washington and beyond.

Students and Othello community team to create equitable, partnership-based innovations

Feb 28 2019

Last weekend, UW College of Education students participated in the second annual education Ideathon, exploring ideas to make Othello UW-Commons a catalyst for equitable education practices.

Partnering to connect research and community

Feb 21 2019

What would you do if you had access to a time machine?

Cory Campbell asked this question at two elementary schools as part of an after-school reading program she led through a local library. The schools were only about a mile apart, but the students responded very differently.

At one location, many children said they’d go back and invent something modern to make a lot of money, or they would go back to see their parents first meet.

At the other, the children focused on more immediate concerns.