Transforming mental health and counseling services for students

Apr 24 2020

In 2017, a deadly wave of wildfires hit northern California, leaving many students and families in Zenia Lemos Horning’s (EdS ‘98) community homeless. 

While her county had prior experience with allocating resources and support to a single school affected by a disaster, Lemos Horning said the 2017 wildfires affected multiple schools in different areas across Healdsburg Unified School District, where she serves as lead psychologist.

Professor launches livestream series "Parenting through COVID-19"

Mar 31 2020

The new normal for millions of parents across the country involves not only adjusting to working from home, but also taking on new responsibilities for educating their children.

The stresses being placed on parents during the COVID-19 pandemic prompted the launch of a new livestream video series hosted by Professor James Mazza, who teaches in the University of Washington College of Education’s school psychology program, and his wife, a licensed psychologist and certified DBT therapist, Elizabeth Dexter-Mazza.

New faculty Q&A: Emma Elliott-Groves

Sep 19 2019

At an early age, Emma Elliott-Groves saw her family advocate for the rights of the First Nations and other Indigenous peoples while centering knowledge passed down by her ancestors across generations.

Today, the new University of Washington College of Education assistant professor of learning sciences and human development is dedicated to drawing on Indigenous and placed-based knowledges and practices to addressing complex social and mental health issues in Indigenous communities.

Podcast: Exploring how teens care for others

Jul 23 2019

When a friend suffers some injustice, teenagers often feel a desire to act and help out. Those situations, particularly when they are challenging to navigate, give young people essential practice in how to care for others. 

AERA Highlight: Latino immigrant parents’ perceptions of self-regulation

Apr 12 2019

While a growing body of research points to the importance of children’s self-regulation skills in early academic success and social-emotional development, little is known about Latino immigrant parents’ perceptions of self-regulation and their own parenting practices.

Kid's Best Friend: Animal connection in the classroom

Jan 11 2019

“Playful” and “energetic” can describe both a puppy and a young child. Both enjoy toys, running and being close to the ones they love. An estimated 70 percent of school aged children have pets, making contemporary American children more likely to live with a pet than with both parents. It’s not surprising that many young children describe their pets as family members and confidants.

Heart for Healing: Supporting mental health in schools

Nov 1 2018

For Kendall Fujioka (BA '14), putting on a second hat for the ABC Unified School District wasn’t exactly by choice. Stepping into the role of program director was necessary when the previous director retired, but she embraced it.

The position placed her in charge of two major grants for the district in southeast Los Angeles County and means she represents ABC on the California Student Mental Health Policy Workgroup. As a project director and member, she contributes to recommendations for state legislation to support youth mental health throughout California schools.

No more timeouts: The need for Positive Behavior Support in early learning

Sep 12 2018

For providers and educators, challenging behavior in children isn’t just a reality, it’s an inevitability. In August, the University of Washington’s Cultivate Learning and Haring Center for Inclusive Education joined local early intervention program Kindering in addressing the issue by gathering early learning providers for an institute on “Equity Focused Positive Behavior Support.”

Facebook Live chat explores youth suicide and mental health

May 24 2018

University of Washington College of Education Professor James Mazza, a former president of the American Association of Suicidology, recently answered questions about youth suicide, mental health issues and the role of educators during a Facebook Live chat.

Promoting self-esteem among African-American girls through racial, cultural connections

Professor and students in classroom
Dec 21 2017

For African-American students, data, alongside societal attitudes and stereotypes, often present a negative picture: a wide academic achievement gap separating them from their white peers. Higher rates of discipline and absenteeism. Discrimination by other students, teachers and the larger community. And just last summer, a study indicated that black girls, from an early age, are perceived as more aggressive and sexual – less innocent – than white girls.