UW professor leads students to hidden history in a small Tennessee town

Jun 7 2019

 

Founders Square was once the hub of its small eastern Tennessee community of Maryville, a block filled with, among other things, a taxi stand, church, bus depot, mechanic shop, and bank.

Today it’s a parking lot — on Saturdays, a farmers market — its decades-old significance largely unknown to anyone other than longtime residents of Maryville.

National Academy of Education/Spencer fellowships awarded to UW faculty members and student

Jun 3 2019

Two scholars who will join the University of Washington College of Education faculty during the coming academic year and a current doctoral student have received fellowships from the National Academy of Education (NAEd)/Spencer Foundation to support projects that aim to improve academic and life outcomes for young people from historically marginalized communities.

Incoming UW faculty members Emma Elliott-Groves and Maribel Santiago were selected as 2019 NAEd/Spencer Postdoctoral Fellows while doctoral student Hannah Nieman received an NAEd/Spencer Dissertation Fellowship.

How to teach and parent better in the age of big data

May 28 2019

In a new commentary piece published by The Conversation, University of Washington Assistant Professor Katie Headrick Taylor discusses the importance of all educators, be they parents or teachers, using data wisely to build pathways to better futures for young people.

Caring for every child

May 10 2019

For Gareth and his parents, Bill and Alyssa Sunderland, good days are precious.

“We knew something wasn’t right as early as seven months,” says Alyssa. Gareth was a happy baby who showed signs of growth and language development, but not in the usual forward trajectory. “He would say a word or gain a skill, then lose another,” she says.

Partnerships highlighted in 2019 STEM for All Video Showcase

May 9 2019

An afterschool STEM learning partnership between Neighborhood House and the University of Washington College of Education and a multi-state initiative to support mentor teachers are featured during the 2019 NSF STEM for All Video Showcase: Research & Design for Impact taking place May 13 to 20.

WATCH: Preparing asset-based equity oriented teachers

Apr 23 2019

Teacher educators from the University of Washington College of Education and Antioch University Seattle discussed their work to transform teacher preparation during a recent YouTube Live chat.

EduTalks explore the promise of school renewal

Apr 19 2019

Researchers and educators shared their insights into opportunities to renew and meaningfully improve how young people and communities experience school during the University of Washington College of Education’s most recent EduTalks event.

Taking place at Sartori Elementary School in Renton, EduTalks: A Place Called School explored practices and policies that can help ensure all students feel like they belong in school and are supported in exploring their passions.

Radical Educators: New book discusses teacher agency and resistance through history

May 16 2019

Tina Y. Gourd (PhD ‘15) and Jennifer Gale de Saxe (PhD ‘14) are graduates of the UW College of Education and co-editors of the recently published book “Rearticulating Education and Social Change: Teacher agency and resistance, early 20th century to the present.”

The book demonstrates activist work by educators throughout the history of education. Underemphasized modes of resistance are analyzed within the context of their communities, and impacts from historical and cultural factors on the individual educators’ efforts are viewed through a lens of teacher agency.

AERA Highlight: Latino immigrant parents’ perceptions of self-regulation

Apr 12 2019

While a growing body of research points to the importance of children’s self-regulation skills in early academic success and social-emotional development, little is known about Latino immigrant parents’ perceptions of self-regulation and their own parenting practices.

AERA Highlight: The impact of nudge letters on school attendance

Apr 10 2019

A growing number of school districts have turned to sending home “nudge” letters when a student misses too many days of school in hopes of boosting attendance and, ultimately, student achievement.

Yet a new study of a recent pilot effort in Seattle Public Schools by a University of Washington College of Education researcher found that nudge letters sent to the families of chronically absent students had mixed results.