The Curriculum and Instruction Master of Education (M.Ed.) requires a minimum of 45 credits. This includes fulfillment of all Graduate School degree requirements as well as the specific requirements of Curriculum and Instruction (both common area and specific study option).

The 45 credits must include at least 18 credits at the 500 level or above and at least 18 credits in numerically graded courses at the 400 level and above. Satisfactory performance on one of the three culminating experiences is also required.

All M.Ed. degrees offered by Curriculum and Instruction share the following requirements:

Foundations of Education (Minimum 10 Credits)

Candidates for the M.Ed. should gain an understanding of the complex social issues that influence curriculum and instruction. You will work with your adviser to select from courses such as History of Education, Education as a Moral Endeavor, Human Learning, and Philosophy of Education.

EDC&I 503 Foundations of Curriculum & Instruction (4 credits) is required of all M.Ed. students who began studies in 2011 or after. Doctoral students may enroll in the course, space permitting, but it is not required.

Specialization (Minimum 15 Credits )

Math & Science

Literacy & Language

Social Studies

Multicultural Education

Supporting Area of Study (Minimum 9 Credits)

See Study Options for details.

Colloquium Presentation: Participation in Two Colloquiums

At the end of your program, you are required to present a visual representation of your work (usually a poster) at the Curriculum and Instruction colloquium. During the colloquium, you will be expected to talk to faculty and students and answer questions about your thesis, project, and other work conducted during your M.Ed. course of study.

In addition, you are required to attend one other colloquium prior to presenting.

Culminating Experience: Choice of Three Options (6 or 9 credits minimum)

Option 1 — Thesis Option: Designing and conducting an empirical or conceptual study of an educational question. (9 credits)

Option 2 — Project Option: Producing, improving, and/or evaluating a product (e.g. curricular materials, instructional strategies, software, etc.) intended for use by practicing professionals. (6 credits)

Option 3 — Written Exam Plus Additional Coursework Option: Additional credits of coursework at the 500 level along with a culminating written exam on the content of your M.Ed. program of study.

Culminating Experience Descriptions

Option 1 Thesis (includes 9 credits in EDUC 700)

A thesis is an original work. It is typically an empirical or conceptual study which poses questions about some aspect of learning, teaching, or curriculum, and answers these by collecting and analyzing data or by synthesizing and critiquing prior work. Typically, this option is selected by those who plan to pursue careers in academia and/or research.

Proposal: If you decide to complete a thesis, you must submit a project proposal. It must be approved and signed by both your adviser and a second reader, who must be approved by your adviser. A proposal is generally composed in four sections:

(1) Rationale for the study
(2) Question(s) to be addressed
(3) Review of related literature and projects
(4) Description of study design (data collection and analysis)

Report: Upon completion of the research, the thesis is submitted to your adviser and second reader. The thesis contains a revised and elaborated version of the proposal along with findings, discussion, and conclusion. Generally, the conclusion will explain what you learned from the thesis, the contribution that has been made to the literature and/or professional practice, and implications for others interested in the same problem or topic.

Oral Examination: Early in the quarter in which you expect to complete the program, you must schedule an oral examination on the project with your adviser and second reader. This is your opportunity to articulate the value of the project and respond to questions about the report.

Option 2 Project (includes 6 credits in EDC&I 600)

A culminating project, like the thesis, is an original work. This option is typically selected by those who plan to pursue careers as practitioners. Unlike the thesis, which is an empirical or conceptual study, a project entails the production, improvement, and/or evaluation of a product intended for use by practicing professionals. Examples could include:

  • Creating and testing curriculum for an outdoor learning center, museum, or science center;
  • Developing and testing a middle school mathematics curriculum;
  • Revising an existing remedial reading program;
  • Developing a suite of new educational tools;
  • Pilot testing an existing instruction program;
  • Developing and pilot testing curriculum materials;
  • Evaluating a school's multicultural curriculum; 
  • Writing a teacher's manual for leading educational tours abroad.

Proposal: If you decide to complete a project, you must submit a proposal. It must be approved by both your adviser and a second reader, who must be approved by your adviser. A proposal is generally composed in four sections:

(1) Purpose
(2) Rationale
(3) Review of related literature and projects
(4) Description of project and procedures

Project Report: Upon completion of the project, a report is submitted to your adviser and second reader. The report contains a revised and elaborated version of the proposal along with a conclusion. The conclusion should explain what you learned from the project, the contribution that has been made to the literature and/or professional practice, and implications for others interested in the same problem or topic. The product itself is appended to the report.

Oral Examination: Early in the quarter in which you expect to complete the program, you must schedule an oral examination on the project with your adviser and second reader. This is your opportunity to articulate the value of the project and respond to questions about the report.

Option 3 Additional Coursework and Written Exam

For this option, you will take additional courses in place of thesis/project work. These courses must be at or above the 500 level and will bring your total credits to at least 45. You will then take a culminating written exam on the content of your M.Ed. program of study.

At the beginning of the quarter in which you intend to graduate, you are responsible for contacting your adviser to arrange an examination. You should select at least two instructors (your adviser and one other) from whom you have taken classes and solicit at least one exam question from each. It is up to the instructors to decide: 1) whether the specific questions will be negotiated with the student or determined entirely by the instructors, and 2) whether the exam will be take-home, completed in the college at a time specified by the instructors, or proctored in a setting with other master’s degree students.

STUDENT RESPONSIBILITIES

  • Maintain contact with your adviser on a quarterly basis to update him/her on your progress, seek advice on coursework, plan your program of study, and select possible readers for your thesis, project, or exam.
  • Become familiar with and follow all degree requirements and procedures as outlined on the College of Education and Graduate School websites.
  • After you have completed approximately 15-25 credits, decide with your adviser whether you will pursue the thesis, project, or additional coursework option.
  • Attend two colloquia, first as an audience member, and then as a presenter.
  • Carefully review the online instructions for degree completion. Contact the Office of Student Services one quarter before your final quarter to discuss completion of the program (e.g. schedule final examination, complete necessary forms) with any questions.

Please note: This is only meant as a broad overview of the M.Ed. program. Refer to the requirements of the Graduate School and the requirements of specific study options as you progress thorough the program to ensure that you have met all requirements for graduation.

Doctoral Program: Ph.D.  and Ed.D. students work closely with their advisers to create highly tailored programs of study that include intermediate and advanced coursework in Curriculum and Instruction as well as outside coursework to gain broader perspective and deeper insight into specialized topics.