Alumni honored by National Council for the Social Studies

Noah Zeichner and Diana Hess
Nov 16 2017

Noah Zeichner (MIT '04) and Diana Hess (PhD '98) are being honored by the National Council for the Social Studies during its annual conference this November.

Zeichner, who teaches at Ingraham International High School in Seattle will receive the 2017 Award for Global Understanding while Hess, dean of University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education, will receive the 2017 Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research in Social Studies Award.

Student aims to advance opportunity for all

Jazmyne Kellogg
Nov 15 2017

As a little girl, Jazmyne Kellogg recalls that her mother would always say her favorite color was black. Every doll Kellogg played with was black and every painting in her family’s house was of a black person.

Study shows investing in expanded learning quality matters

Two children at a pond
Nov 13 2017

At Prime Time Extended Learning Center in Tacoma, Gemma Stephani recalls welcoming a student who had been expelled from a private elementary school due to behavioral issues.

The student began attending Prime Time after enrolling in a public elementary school, and as the staff grew to know him better, Stephani witnessed a transformation as the child learned to verbalize his feelings more effectively.

Leading for system-wide change

Scott Seaman
Nov 8 2017

Freshman year of high school was difficult for Scott Seaman. He was a disengaged learner who struggled to apply himself in the classroom.

Yet Seaman’s Spanish teacher recognized his potential and challenged him to step up. Seaman responded, going on to earn his bachelor’s degree in Spanish and become a teacher at Capital High School in Olympia.

At Capital, Seaman found himself drawn to those students who weren’t affluent and college-bound, who didn’t always have an adult pushing them to fulfill their academic potential or aim for post-secondary education.

Doctoral student's mission: Training the great teachers of tomorrow

Weijia Wang
Nov 2 2017

For the past decade, Weijia Wang has been on a journey to discover what makes an excellent teacher.

That journey started in China when, as a high school student, Wang heard reports that there was a large gap in teacher quality, especially in English, across the country. Wang would go on to earn her master’s in English education at Shanghai International Studies University, but despite earning excellent grades, she soon realized that she was unprepared for the rigors of real-world teaching.

New book offers guidance on fostering talents of early learners

Students working with robot
Nov 2 2017

All young children possess gifts and talents, Nancy Hertzog says, and a new book by the University of Washington College of Education professor offers insights into how parents, teachers and administrators can help early learners develop their talents.

Professor explores ‘The Struggle for the Soul of Teacher Education’

Elementary teacher candidate
Oct 31 2017

Across the United States, and indeed throughout the world, there’s passionate debate about how to best prepare teachers and ensure all students are taught by highly-qualified educators.

Focus on professional growth, leadership key to Washington’s new teacher evaluation

Teacher with a student
Oct 30 2017

Sustaining ongoing improvement in instruction is a persistent challenge for schools and districts, but Washington state’s adoption of a new teacher and principal evaluation system earlier this decade is contributing to more collaborative improvement efforts, a new study by University of Washington College of Education researchers finds.

The power of connection

Katie Ward
Oct 27 2017

Katie Ward (MEd ‘11) believes in the power of connecting with students. For Ward and her students at Sequim High School’s Hope Academy, building trust and practicing emotional honesty is the foundation for creating deeper relationships and for giving young people who’ve struggled in traditional classrooms an opportunity to find their path through high school.

At Hope Academy, an alternative program for ninth through 11th-graders at Sequim High School, students work in a mixed-grade class for one or more periods each day. 

Raising Washington’s youngest learners

Professor Soojin Oh Park at EDU Talks: Raising Washington
Oct 26 2017

In Washington state, one out of five early learners grow up in poverty. Fewer than half are kindergarten-ready.

On Oct. 20, eight of Washington’s leading early learning researchers shared their insights into what educators, communities and the state as a whole can do to give all children a fair start to grow and reach their potential during EDU Talks: Raising Washington, organized by the University of Washington College of Education.