Professor to present Samuel E. Kelly Distinguished Faculty Lecture

Joe Lott
Mar 8 2017

Joe Lott, associate professor in the University of Washington College of Education and faculty director for the UW Brotherhood Initiative, will present the UW Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity’s (OMA&D) 13th annual Samuel E. Kelly Distinguished Faculty Lecture, on April 7.

Leading the drive for assessment literacy

Assessment in education
Mar 6 2017

Educators collect and use data on a daily basis to make decisions about how to improve teaching and learning. Yet it’s not enough to simply use data in decision-making; the data used must be sound, interpreted and used appropriately.

Redesigning family engagement in education

Family Leadership Design Collaborative national convening
Feb 27 2017

Joyce Parker devotes her heart and soul to making sure kids are in school and pointed toward graduation.

“Everyone’s responsible when children are out of school: parents, social workers, church members, teachers, police officers and so on,” said the director of Citizens for a Better Greenville.

That belief set the foundation of the organization’s “Missing in Action” campaign, launched as a concerted community approach to boosting the Mississippi city’s 66 percent graduation rate.

Statement on the College's mission

Feb 27 2017

The University of Washington College of Education Faculty Council recently approved the following statement on the College's mission in the current civic landscape.

Report: Washington teachers less experienced, diversity gap remains wide

High school classroom
Feb 22 2017

While Washington’s teacher workforce is getting younger, closing the diversity gap in the profession has proven stubbornly resistant over the past two decades according to a new report exploring teacher retention and mobility in the state.

Literacy scholar named AERA Fellow

Sheila Valencia
Feb 21 2017

Sheila Valencia, a nationally-recognized scholar of literacy assessment, instruction and policy and University of Washington College of Education professor, has been named a Fellow of the American Educational Research Association.

A drive to inspire

Siena Traverso
Feb 14 2017

Even as a preschooler, University of Washington junior Siena Traverso recalls having a passion for education. After returning home, she would create a classroom with her stuffed animals and teach what she had learned that day.

Years later, Traverso’s enthusiasm for teaching is the driving force that led her to the UW College of Education. She knew her college had to have an education program, and among her top choices, the UW stood out.

Breaking down barriers

Equity Summit of Gifted Education
Feb 13 2017

Growing up in Ballard, Jailyn Fonseca was identified as a highly capable student in elementary school.

It wasn’t until 5th grade, however, when she noticed that she was one of the only students of color in her school identified as highly capable. 

“I never got to be with other students who were similar to me, who shared the same cultural values I did,” said Fonseca, who now attends Ingraham High School in Seattle.

Fonseca isn’t alone.

Making math class more like mathematics

Tracy Zager
Feb 6 2017

Boring. Stressful. Humiliating.

For many students, those are the feelings most commonly associated with math class.

Tracy Zager (MIT ‘02) grew up loving to solve puzzles and riddles, but by high school a series of bad experiences put her on the brink of giving up math altogether. One of Zager’s family friends made her promise to give it another try in college, however, and her experience in an experimental, project-based calculus class changed her perspective forever.

Q&A: Can history guide the future of education?

Lakeridge Elementary School
Feb 2 2017

Many people cling to the ideal of “the school” as the great equalizer, a place where Americans are made and equal opportunity is realized.

Yet “the school” has been and continues to be an agent in oppression argues Joy Williamson-Lott, a professor of the history of education at the University of Washington College of Education. Throughout history, each time communities of color have made progress toward equal educational opportunity, a major societal push-back has caused the loss of gains that appeared won.