A pathway to discovery

Mar 8 2018

A few weeks into her new job training teen volunteers at Pacific Science Center how to take up issues of equity and social justice in their work, Pilar Letrondo noticed something concerning mid-way through a session she was leading on identity.

"All the white kids sat on one side of the table and all of the non-white kids sat on the other," she said. "[I] realized that I needed to address the seating situation.”

It was a striking example of how physical spaces can impact teaching and learning, and even more so, the challenge of overcoming bias in educational spaces.

Taking on bias in special education

Feb 27 2018

As a novice teacher in a Denver elementary school, Nathan Hoston recalls his growing discomfort with how students were being referred to special education services.

“The first year," Hoston said, "the system seemed biased and subjective in a way that made me uncomfortable."

Hoston, who at the time was teaching kindergarten through second grade students with high-incidence disabilities, saw black boys disproportionately represented in special education services at his school and surrounding schools.

Connecting grandparents and grandchildren with special needs

Feb 24 2018

A new study being conducted at the University of Washington's Haring Center for Research and Training in Inclusive Education is examining the relationships between children with special needs and their grandparents—and how to enhance those relations. Xueyan Yang, a doctoral student is special education at the UW College of Education, is using photographs as a social aid to strength the bonds between generations.

Teaching connection to one another—and the world

Kacy Lebby
Feb 15 2018

As a third-grade teacher, Kacy Lebby (MIT ‘15) is bringing the outdoors into her classroom by teaching all subjects, not just science, from an environmental perspective.

Yet growing up, Lebby never saw herself becoming a teacher. As a hands-on learner, she always felt more comfortable outdoors than in a classroom. This trait led her to become an outdoor educator, where she taught subjects such as recreation and backpacking to middle and high school students.

Banks to present Samuel E. Kelly Distinguished Faculty Lecture

Feb 12 2018

University of Washington Professor James A. Banks, known widely as “the father of multicultural education,” will present the UW Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity’s (OMA&D) 14th annual Samuel E. Kelly Distinguished Faculty Lecture on April 13 in Kane Hall Room 220.

Banks is the Kerry and Linda Killinger Endowed Chair in Diversity Studies and founding director of the Center for Multicultural Education in the UW College of Education.

Early learning focus of EDU Talks on March 28

Feb 7 2018

What will it take to ensure every child in Washington gets a strong start in life? On March 28, nine early learning researchers and practitioners will discuss how the state can improve early childhood education and care for all during EDU Talks: Raising Washington, presented by the University of Washington College of Education.

Empowering students to become their own advocates

Feb 1 2018

As program director of the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at Wenatchee Valley College, Yuritzi Lozano (MEd ‘13) has witnessed the power of students becoming advocates for their own education.

Haring Center celebrates 2017 achievements

Jan 26 2018

Researchers at the University of Washington's Haring Center for Research and Training in Inclusive Education spent 2017 like most years: asking critical questions about inclusive education, researching and testing new strategies, and broadly sharing their research findings to add new knowledge and advance the field of inclusive education and early intervention.

Education students design innovations to better serve immigrant youth

Undergraduate students collaborate
Jan 24 2018

Over 24 intense hours, teams of University of Washington education students drew upon design thinking processes to craft new ideas for better addressing the educational needs of immigrant and refugee youth and families.

Closing the potential gap

Jan 22 2018

While visiting two high schools on opposite sides of Chicago, Rhoan Garnett (PhD ‘18) experienced first-hand the detrimental effects of the college information gap.

Garnett, then assistant dean of admissions for Bowdoin College, started his day visiting a well-resourced school in north Chicago. He remembers students at the school being respectful and interested in speaking with him.