Raising Washington’s youngest learners

Professor Soojin Oh Park at EDU Talks: Raising Washington
Oct 26 2017

In Washington state, one out of five early learners grow up in poverty. Fewer than half are kindergarten-ready.

On Oct. 20, eight of Washington’s leading early learning researchers shared their insights into what educators, communities and the state as a whole can do to give all children a fair start to grow and reach their potential during EDU Talks: Raising Washington, organized by the University of Washington College of Education.

Doctoral students to present research Nov. 3

Teacher with kindergarten students
Oct 24 2017

Six University of Washington College of Education doctoral students will present their research projects on Nov. 3, with topics including science practices for school readiness and academic success, anxiety and academic achievement among special education students, and more.

The Research and Inquiry Presentations are a major milestone in the studies of each PhD candidate at the College of Education and will begin at noon in Miller Hall 112 with opening remarks by Deborah McCutchen, associate dean for research.

Jean Hernandez ‘96 honored for service to diverse communities

Jean Hernandez
Oct 24 2017

Jean Hernandez (EdD ‘96), a higher education leader who has dedicated her career to opening opportunities for diverse communities in the Puget Sound region, is being honored this month by the University of Washington’s Multicultural Alumni Partnership.

A healthy future after kidney failure

Wade Washington
Oct 18 2017

Wade Washington was just 15 years old when he got a phone call that changed his life: He was going to receive a kidney transplant. At birth, Washington was diagnosed with bilateral cystic kidney disease, a genetic disorder that caused one kidney not to function properly and prevented the other one from growing.

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New faculty profile: Django Paris

Django Paris
Oct 17 2017

While schools have too often reproduced inequalities in society, Django Paris believes in their potential to create a more equal and pluralist society.

This January, Paris will join the University of Washington College of Education as the inaugural holder of the James A. and Cherry A. Banks Professorship in Multicultural Education and incoming director of the Banks Center for Educational Justice, which will formally launch in fall 2018.

College to strengthen research partnerships with Washington schools, communities

Teacher professional development with students
Oct 12 2017

The University of Washington College of Education will deepen research-practice partnerships that are expanding access to high-quality educational opportunities for underserved students and communities in Washington state with a $1.7 million grant from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Over the next two years, the grant will build on the College’s extensive partnerships with more than 300 schools, districts, educational organizations and communities across the state and identify key areas of opportunity along the cradle-to-career education continuum.

Q&A with new faculty member Angel Fettig

Angel Fettig
Oct 11 2017

For more than a decade, Angel Fettig has worked with young children and their families as a teacher, researcher, trainer and consultant.

Alum explores science literacy through community partnerships

Shelley Stromholt
Oct 9 2017

This academic year, Shelley Stromholt (PhD '15), a University of Washington College of Education postdoctoral scholar and alumna, has received a prestigious Fulbright Research Award to study community-centered science learning alongside educational researchers in Norway.

Partnership brings ‘Next Generation’ science into Seattle classrooms

Science teaching with elementary students
Oct 6 2017

The town of Faraday has a problem.

Its citizens are interested in building a magnetic train to make it easier to connect with other towns, but they need to figure out how to make the technology work.

That’s where the town’s scientists—in this case a group of two dozen Seattle 3rd, 4th and 5th graders enrolled in a summer learning program in the Beacon Hill neighborhood—come in.

It’s their job to collect evidence about how magnets work, determine whether the technology could be used to power a train and then explain their findings to the citizens of Faraday.

New faculty profile: Margaret Beneke

Margaret Beneke
Sep 28 2017

From her earliest years, Margaret (Maggie) Beneke experienced the impact an inclusive educational environment can make on young people.

Following in the footsteps of her mother, who taught in an inclusive early childhood program, Beneke went on to become an early childhood teacher in inclusive settings. Today, her research and pedagogy focuses on increasing access to inclusive, equitable education for all children and families.