Working for 'noisy' classrooms

Alexandra Goodell
Dec 12 2017

At the University of Washington’s Robinson Center for Young Scholars, Alexandra Goodell (PhD ‘18) has watched students get so immersed in learning that everything else gets put by the wayside.

“We had one teacher in the accelerated Algebra II class last year and she was saying, ‘The students all wanted to take their books out to lunch with them! I had to make them take a break’,” Goodell said.

Craig named director of Leadership for Learning (EdD) program

Anthony Craig
Dec 6 2017

Anthony Craig, a Washington educator with expertise developing systems that foster equitable educational outcomes, has been named director of the University of Washington College of Education’s Leadership for Learning (EdD) program.

Craig, who will assume his duties on January 2, has served as a teacher, instructional coach, principal and, most recently, director of diversity, equity and outreach for Edmonds School District.

Creating a culture of success

Adina Brito
Dec 5 2017

At Evergreen Elementary School in Shelton, most students grow up in high-poverty environments. Many are English language learners who are the children of immigrants from Latin America.

In the face of adversity, however, Principal Adina Brito (MIT '96) is helping create a culture where all students believe they can succeed, for which she recently was honored as a member of the 2017 Class of National Distinguished Principals.

Preschoolers in Seattle pilot program show gains in kindergarten readiness, study shows

Two preschoolers in classroom
Dec 4 2017

Just two years into Seattle’s trial effort to close the kindergarten readiness gap, there are promising signs that children of color and those from low-income households are making gains.

Grant to build Washington’s bilingual educator capacity

Teacher in a dual language classroom
Nov 29 2017

In the coming year, Kristin Percy Calaff will be hiring up to 20 teachers who can speak Spanish or Vietnamese to staff the growing number of dual language classrooms in Highline Public Schools.

That is, if she can find them.

Experiences with bullying provide motivation

Nov 20 2017

As an elementary school student, Caroline Black remembers being invited to a classmate’s house, where the group decided to play school. Black’s all-female peers told her to pretend to be a child with special needs who needed a walker to cross the room, then suddenly began kicking and pushing her while yelling derogatory comments about her mental and physical abilities.

Alumni honored by National Council for the Social Studies

Noah Zeichner and Diana Hess
Nov 16 2017

Noah Zeichner (MIT '04) and Diana Hess (PhD '98) are being honored by the National Council for the Social Studies during its annual conference this November.

Zeichner, who teaches at Ingraham International High School in Seattle will receive the 2017 Award for Global Understanding while Hess, dean of University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Education, will receive the 2017 Jean Dresden Grambs Distinguished Career Research in Social Studies Award.

Student aims to advance opportunity for all

Jazmyne Kellogg
Nov 15 2017

As a little girl, Jazmyne Kellogg recalls that her mother would always say her favorite color was black. Every doll Kellogg played with was black and every painting in her family’s house was of a black person.

Study shows investing in expanded learning quality matters

Two children at a pond
Nov 13 2017

At Prime Time Extended Learning Center in Tacoma, Gemma Stephani recalls welcoming a student who had been expelled from a private elementary school due to behavioral issues.

The student began attending Prime Time after enrolling in a public elementary school, and as the staff grew to know him better, Stephani witnessed a transformation as the child learned to verbalize his feelings more effectively.

Leading for system-wide change

Scott Seaman
Nov 8 2017

Freshman year of high school was difficult for Scott Seaman. He was a disengaged learner who struggled to apply himself in the classroom.

Yet Seaman’s Spanish teacher recognized his potential and challenged him to step up. Seaman responded, going on to earn his bachelor’s degree in Spanish and become a teacher at Capital High School in Olympia.

At Capital, Seaman found himself drawn to those students who weren’t affluent and college-bound, who didn’t always have an adult pushing them to fulfill their academic potential or aim for post-secondary education.