Top 9 podcasts of 2019

Dec 20 2019

During 2019, faculty and students discussed their research into school improvement strategies, teacher leadership, teenagers' social-moral identity and more in the University of Washington College of Education's podcast series. Listen to our most popular podcasts of the year (as of Dec. 19) below.

Podcast: Disrupting the “Asians Are Good at Math” narrative

Jan 6 2020

While stereotypes about the academic success of Asian students may seem harmless, those false narratives dehumanize Asian people, argues University of Washington College of Education Professor Niral Shah.

Professor’s new book explores equitable collaborations with families and communities

Dec 10 2019

A new book by University of Washington College of Education Professor Ann M. Ishimaru, “Just Schools: Building Equitable Collaborations with Families and Communities,” examines the challenges and possibilities of creating more equitable forms of collaboration among non-dominant families, communities and schools.

Podcast: New report offers recommendations to improve doctoral education across the globe

Nov 5 2019

An international group of researchers and leaders of doctoral education recently released a report with seven recommendations to improve doctoral education worldwide following a September convening organized by the University of Washington College of Education’s Center for Innovation and Research in Graduate Education (CIRGE). 

New faculty Q&A: David Knight

Oct 10 2019

Combining his research on the economics of education and school finance with a passion for the transformative power of education, David Knight aims to better understand policies that can contribute to more equitable education systems.

New faculty Q&A: Maribel Santiago

Oct 1 2019

As a student growing up in Los Angeles, Maribel Santiago found it difficult to engage with K-12 history courses that were disconnected from her lived experiences. Yet the stories her parents shared about their family in Oaxaca, Mexico, and their experiences as immigrants inspired her interest in the teaching and learning of Latinx history.

New faculty Q&A: Emma Elliott-Groves

Sep 19 2019

At an early age, Emma Elliott-Groves saw her family advocate for the rights of the First Nations and other Indigenous peoples while centering knowledge passed down by her ancestors across generations.

Today, the new University of Washington College of Education assistant professor of learning sciences and human development is dedicated to drawing on Indigenous and placed-based knowledges and practices to addressing complex social and mental health issues in Indigenous communities.

New faculty Q&A: Julia Duncheon

Sep 18 2019

As a teacher at a high-poverty high school in Brooklyn, Julia Duncheon all-too-often saw her school’s top students go on to college yet encounter roadblocks that kept them from completing their degrees.

New faculty Q&A: Niral Shah

Sep 11 2019

Aspirations of becoming a technology entrepreneur shifted for Niral Shah when, as a college student, he began working with students and community leaders in West Philadelphia.

New faculty Q&A: Molly Shea

Sep 4 2019

During her younger years, Molly Shea did much of her learning through informal means such as playing soccer and spending time in the outdoors with her father. It was not until college that she began to see the possibilities for transformative learning in school and through community-led social movements.