Making injustice visible

Sue Feldman
Apr 13 2017

As an undergraduate, Sue Feldman (PhD ‘10) fell in love with the study of learning.

That passion led her to teaching in an elementary classroom, where she’d be able to engage with student learning on a daily basis.

Soon after entering the profession, however, Feldman started observing the social factors that can make a significant impact on student learning. Seeing the negative effects of bias in classrooms and schools was an eye-opening experience.

Study: Principals stay in high-poverty schools, diversity gap remains

White Center Heights
Mar 22 2017

A larger percentage of Washington principals are staying in schools with high poverty rates than the national average, and a greater proportion of elementary assistant principals work in high-needs schools, according to a new University of Washington study of principal retention and mobility.

Professor to present Samuel E. Kelly Distinguished Faculty Lecture

Joe Lott
Mar 8 2017

Joe Lott, associate professor in the University of Washington College of Education and faculty director for the UW Brotherhood Initiative, will present the UW Office of Minority Affairs & Diversity’s (OMA&D) 13th annual Samuel E. Kelly Distinguished Faculty Lecture, on April 7.

Study: Sustained investment in lowest-performing schools can drive improvement

Elementary school classroom
Mar 29 2017

School turnarounds can be successful, but evidence-based reforms and a dollop of patience are essential ingredients.

That’s the key finding in a new study by a University of Washington College of Education researcher and colleagues at the University of California, Irvine and Stanford University who explore the effects of federal School Improvement Grants (SIG) aimed at improving the nation’s lowest-performing schools.

Redesigning family engagement in education

Family Leadership Design Collaborative national convening
Feb 27 2017

Joyce Parker devotes her heart and soul to making sure kids are in school and pointed toward graduation.

“Everyone’s responsible when children are out of school: parents, social workers, church members, teachers, police officers and so on,” said the director of Citizens for a Better Greenville.

That belief set the foundation of the organization’s “Missing in Action” campaign, launched as a concerted community approach to boosting the Mississippi city’s 66 percent graduation rate.

Breaking down barriers

Equity Summit of Gifted Education
Feb 13 2017

Growing up in Ballard, Jailyn Fonseca was identified as a highly capable student in elementary school.

It wasn’t until 5th grade, however, when she noticed that she was one of the only students of color in her school identified as highly capable. 

“I never got to be with other students who were similar to me, who shared the same cultural values I did,” said Fonseca, who now attends Ingraham High School in Seattle.

Fonseca isn’t alone.

Q&A: Can history guide the future of education?

Lakeridge Elementary School
Feb 2 2017

Many people cling to the ideal of “the school” as the great equalizer, a place where Americans are made and equal opportunity is realized.

Yet “the school” has been and continues to be an agent in oppression argues Joy Williamson-Lott, a professor of the history of education at the University of Washington College of Education. Throughout history, each time communities of color have made progress toward equal educational opportunity, a major societal push-back has caused the loss of gains that appeared won.

Summit to explore equity in gifted education

Robinson Center summer session
Jan 17 2017

Educators, parents and community members are invited to join a conversation about how to open access to advanced learning opportunities during the University of Washington’s Equity Summit on Gifted Education, taking place Feb. 9 and 10.

Reimagining the role of communities in education

Aditi Rajendran
Jan 11 2017

As a newly minted business graduate, Aditi Rajendran envisioned a career helping manage non-profit organizations. After graduation, she landed a job with AmeriCorps and was put in charge of establishing a tutoring program in an urban elementary school. Feeling removed from the inner workings of the school as a tutoring coordinator, the following year she transitioned to a position providing direct reading instruction support to K-3rd grade students.

New partnership aims to improve equity, coherence in science education

ACESSE Collaboration
Jan 9 2017

Learning scientists from the University of Washington and the University of Colorado Boulder, along with educators, are embarking on a national effort to make science learning more coherent and equitable.