Alum explores science literacy through community partnerships

Shelley Stromholt
Oct 9 2017

This academic year, Shelley Stromholt (PhD '15), a University of Washington College of Education postdoctoral scholar and alumna, has received a prestigious Fulbright Research Award to study community-centered science learning alongside educational researchers in Norway.

Advancing inclusion in education

Katy Bateman
Sep 7 2017

After growing up alongside a family member with autism, Katy Bateman (PhD ‘17) was inspired to become a champion for inclusion in education.

Throughout her life, Bateman was intrigued by the therapies and education services that were used to help her cousin learn.

“She had limited language when she was younger and we worked a lot on her language,” Bateman said. “As I got older, I saw her language progress into speaking full sentences. She now has a part-time job and she loves it. Seeing her language start to click made me think, ‘How can I do this for other kids, too?’”

How reading and writing with your child boost more than just literacy

Dad reading to child
Aug 28 2017

Children who read and write at home — whether for assignments or just for fun — are building long-term study and executive function skills, according to a paper from the University of Washington.

And while home literacy activities have already been associated with higher test scores, the new study shows these activities also provide students with tools for lifetime success.

Building community in the teaching profession

Elzena McVicar
Jul 17 2017

Growing up in New Orleans, Elzena McVicar (MIT ‘10) was surrounded by a family filled with teachers. Years of family conversations about education convinced McVicar that teaching was not for her.

While working on her bachelor's degree in anthropology, however, McVicar took a work study job as a tutor. Then, after graduating from college, she found herself working in an elementary school as an AmeriCorps volunteer. These two experiences changed McVicar’s perceptions of education, ultimately leading her in a new professional direction.

Mentors show pathway to teaching

Veronica Whitley
Apr 24 2017

As a third grader, Veronica Whitley (MEd '17) didn't think of herself as "good" at school.

Needing extra support in reading and writing, Whitley's teacher, Mr. Leonard, was one of her first mentors.

"He showed me that school could be fun and also really believed in me," Whitley said.

Thanks to Mr. Leonard's mentorship, Whitley found herself transforming from a struggling student into a confident, eager learner.

Making injustice visible

Sue Feldman
Apr 13 2017

As an undergraduate, Sue Feldman (PhD ‘10) fell in love with the study of learning.

That passion led her to teaching in an elementary classroom, where she’d be able to engage with student learning on a daily basis.

Soon after entering the profession, however, Feldman started observing the social factors that can make a significant impact on student learning. Seeing the negative effects of bias in classrooms and schools was an eye-opening experience.

Making school a more humanizing place

Irene Yoon
Apr 6 2017

In diverse schools, creating a sense of belonging for students and faculty of all backgrounds can be a challenge that directly impacts one’s ability to learn and succeed.

University of Utah professor Irene Yoon (PhD ‘11) is familiar with the feeling of being an outsider after having lived in urban and rural places on both coasts. She understands the experience of learning new cultures while adjusting to various resources and relationships.

Alum uses technology to empower learning

Michelle Zimmerman
Apr 3 2017

By harnessing the power of data, Michelle Zimmerman (MEd '07, PhD '11) is helping set the standard for how educators can use technology as a tool to empower kids’ learning.

The innovative approach to teaching and learning taken by Zimmerman, the nationally-recognized director of Renton Prep, was sparked by watching her mother, a special education teacher who enjoyed bringing new practices into her classroom.

Alum works to open access to higher education

Sheila Edwards Lange
Mar 15 2017

In the midst of Seattle’s booming economy, many citizens find themselves struggling with a widening socioeconomic gap. Sheila Edwards Lange (PhD '06) is working to create education and career opportunities for those whose future in the city is at risk.

Since her appointment as president of Seattle Central College in 2015, Lange’s focus is making sure that all Seattle residents have access to education, earn a living wage and contribute to a vibrant community.

Alumni Spotlight: Dr. Jane Lo

Jane Lo, Ph.D., was always a strong supporter of the former Office of Minority Recruitment and Retention (OMRR) and a recognized student at the College of Education.