Supporting students in transition

Jul 26 2018

In a phenomena known as “summer melt,” many high school graduates plan to pursue higher education, but something derails them over the summer.

“They get confused, they don’t know how to fill something out, and then they don’t show up to their first day, and don’t show up for the rest of the year,” Natalia Esquivel - Silva (BA '18) explained.

It’s a chain of events that throws off the plans of many young people, with lifelong consequences.

Alum taps the power of data to find solutions

Jun 14 2018

An astonishing amount of data is collected in education—a typical student will accumulate millions of data points, between preschool and high school graduation alone, ranging from standardized tests to administrative logs—yet leveraging all that information to drive improvement is a persistent challenge.

Jose Hernandez (PhD ‘15) is working to bridge that gap by making education data more accessible and actionable.

College celebrates Class of 2018

Jun 6 2018

More than 700 new teachers, researchers, leaders, policymakers and early childhood professionals were honored during the University of Washington College of Education’s graduation ceremonies on June 5.

The festivities featured two members of the College’s Class of 2018 discussing their role as educator-activists in ensuring access to high-quality education for all students.

Adaurennaya Onyewuenyi, who graduated with her doctorate in learning sciences and human development, called on her classmates to engage daily in work to create a more equitable educational system.

Hess ‘98 honored with College’s Distinguished Alumnus Award

Jun 1 2018

Diana Hess (PhD '98), a scholar renowned for her work advancing civic education, has received the University of Washington College of Education’s 2018 Distinguished Alumnus Award.

Hess, dean of the School of Education at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and holder the Karen A. Falk Distinguished Chair of Education, is winner of two of the most prestigious awards in education research: the American Educational Research Association’s Outstanding Book Award (2016) and the Grawemeyer Award in Education (2017).

Multicultural education symposium to celebrate impact, envision future

Middle school teacher and students
Apr 11 2018

For the past 50 years, the University of Washington has helped lay the foundations for educators worldwide to think deeply about how to empower all students to become productive citizens.

On April 27, this work and the leadership of James A. Banks, Kerry and Linda Killinger Endowed Chair in Diversity Studies, will be celebrated during the UW Center for Multicultural Education’s 30th annual symposium.

Teaching connection to one another—and the world

Kacy Lebby
Feb 15 2018

As a third-grade teacher, Kacy Lebby (MIT ‘15) is bringing the outdoors into her classroom by teaching all subjects, not just science, from an environmental perspective.

Yet growing up, Lebby never saw herself becoming a teacher. As a hands-on learner, she always felt more comfortable outdoors than in a classroom. This trait led her to become an outdoor educator, where she taught subjects such as recreation and backpacking to middle and high school students.

Empowering students to become their own advocates

Feb 1 2018

As program director of the College Assistance Migrant Program (CAMP) at Wenatchee Valley College, Yuritzi Lozano (MEd ‘13) has witnessed the power of students becoming advocates for their own education.

Creating spaces where students feel valued

Pedro Navejas Rodriguez
Jan 3 2018

Whether it’s in the classroom or after school, Pedro Navejas Rodriguez (U-ACT ‘13) is working to create spaces where all students feel valued.

That desire brought Navejas Rodriguez, a first-generation college graduate, to Grandview Middle School where he teaches 8th grade journalism and language arts, as well as Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) and alternative learning methods classes.

Working for 'noisy' classrooms

Alexandra Goodell
Dec 12 2017

At the University of Washington’s Robinson Center for Young Scholars, Alexandra Goodell (PhD ‘18) has watched students get so immersed in learning that everything else gets put by the wayside.

“We had one teacher in the accelerated Algebra II class last year and she was saying, ‘The students all wanted to take their books out to lunch with them! I had to make them take a break’,” Goodell said.