Alum works to advance justice in teacher preparation

Jan 30 2019

As a teacher in Atlanta, Jacob Hackett (PhD '16) saw a disproportionate number of his minority students placed in special education and segregated from the classroom.

“I did see special education as — unfortunately for many students, particularly for students of color, particularly for boys of color — a way of getting them out of the classroom,” Hackett said. “And unfortunately headed to negative outcomes. I didn’t like that.”

Kid's Best Friend: Animal connection in the classroom

Jan 11 2019

“Playful” and “energetic” can describe both a puppy and a young child. Both enjoy toys, running and being close to the ones they love. An estimated 70 percent of school aged children have pets, making contemporary American children more likely to live with a pet than with both parents. It’s not surprising that many young children describe their pets as family members and confidants.

IslandWood alum starts forest preschool

Dec 21 2018

 

The Asheville Farmstead School is an outdoor, play-based early childhood education center founded and directed by Lauren Brown (MEd '12), an alumnus of the Education for Environment and Community graduate program at IslandWood. There’s a squat and homey stone farmhouse-turned-schoolhouse, but the children don’t spend much time in it, not when there’s a garden to tend, pine stumps and planks with which to build out in the yard, and 25 acres of fields and forested hills to explore.

Supporting student learning about race

Nov 8 2018

 

“I can’t play with you because your skin is brown.”

When Caryn Park (PhD '10) heard one of her preschool students say this to his friend, she felt helpless. She knew what it felt like from her own experience as a child of color in the U.S. and knew that it wasn’t fair to have to feel that.

“I felt like I knew nothing,” Park recalled. “I felt like I had no skills with which to support these children.”

Park calls this her critical incident.

Heart for Healing: Supporting mental health in schools

Nov 1 2018

For Kendall Fujioka (BA '14), putting on a second hat for the ABC Unified School District wasn’t exactly by choice. Stepping into the role of program director was necessary when the previous director retired, but she embraced it.

The position placed her in charge of two major grants for the district in southeast Los Angeles County and means she represents ABC on the California Student Mental Health Policy Workgroup. As a project director and member, she contributes to recommendations for state legislation to support youth mental health throughout California schools.

Expanding possibilities: Research into dance and the mind

Oct 15 2018

When Matthew Henley '13 came across an educational psychology course at the University of Washington, his response was, “That sounds interesting. I like teaching and I’ve been taking classes in psychology, but I didn’t know these things were combined as an academic discipline.”

Spanish immersion teacher named Global Learning Fellow for Washington state

Oct 1 2018

She started the application from Vietnam with only a week before the deadline. She had an outline and just needed to put all the pieces together. Then she hit a roadblock.

How did she exemplify one or more habits of a globally competent individual? How did she, as a teacher, foster global citizenship in a classroom environment?

Jennifer Macias Morris (MIT ‘15) knew she had what the NEA Foundation was looking for in selecting its Global Learning Fellows—she just needed to figure out how to explain it.

Supporting students in transition

Jul 26 2018

In a phenomena known as “summer melt,” many high school graduates plan to pursue higher education, but something derails them over the summer.

“They get confused, they don’t know how to fill something out, and then they don’t show up to their first day, and don’t show up for the rest of the year,” Natalia Esquivel - Silva (BA '18) explained.

It’s a chain of events that throws off the plans of many young people, with lifelong consequences.

Alum taps the power of data to find solutions

Jun 14 2018

An astonishing amount of data is collected in education—a typical student will accumulate millions of data points, between preschool and high school graduation alone, ranging from standardized tests to administrative logs—yet leveraging all that information to drive improvement is a persistent challenge.

Jose Hernandez (PhD ‘15) is working to bridge that gap by making education data more accessible and actionable.

College celebrates Class of 2018

Jun 6 2018

More than 700 new teachers, researchers, leaders, policymakers and early childhood professionals were honored during the University of Washington College of Education’s graduation ceremonies on June 5.

The festivities featured two members of the College’s Class of 2018 discussing their role as educator-activists in ensuring access to high-quality education for all students.

Adaurennaya Onyewuenyi, who graduated with her doctorate in learning sciences and human development, called on her classmates to engage daily in work to create a more equitable educational system.